ourpresidents:

We’re celebrating the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, signed July 2, 1964.  Happy Independence Day weekend!
Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at a Civil Rights Meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House.  January 18, 1964.

ourpresidents:

We’re celebrating the anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, signed July 2, 1964.  Happy Independence Day weekend!

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at a Civil Rights Meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House.  January 18, 1964.

William T. Webb Memorial Gallery Dedication, this Thursday!

William T. Webb Memorial Gallery Dedication, this Thursday!

This is Mr. Washington and Mrs. Waters,  who stopped by for a visit today.  Both are alumni of the Charles Young Elementary and Browne Junior High Schools on the Educational Hill campus in Northeast.  We had a lovely time talking with them (and learning from them) about the Educational Hill schools and teachers, including Ms. Burke - a strict disciplinarian that taught her students how to clap, and Principal Stinson - who is the reason why Mr. Washington “still cannot walk on the left side of a hallway.”  They also reminisced over their days growing up in Langston Terrace.  Ken enjoyed taking them on a tour afterwards.  I was happy to spend a part of the day listening and learning some DC school history from “the horse’s mouth,” so to speak.
They are holding a picture of the May 1954 Kindergarten Class from Charles Young Elementary School.

This is Mr. Washington and Mrs. Waters,  who stopped by for a visit today.  Both are alumni of the Charles Young Elementary and Browne Junior High Schools on the Educational Hill campus in Northeast.  We had a lovely time talking with them (and learning from them) about the Educational Hill schools and teachers, including Ms. Burke - a strict disciplinarian that taught her students how to clap, and Principal Stinson - who is the reason why Mr. Washington “still cannot walk on the left side of a hallway.”  They also reminisced over their days growing up in Langston Terrace.  Ken enjoyed taking them on a tour afterwards.  I was happy to spend a part of the day listening and learning some DC school history from “the horse’s mouth,” so to speak.

They are holding a picture of the May 1954 Kindergarten Class from Charles Young Elementary School.

Emancipation Day in the schools
This is a page from a Record Book for Intermediate School No 3, which was inside the Stevens School (still standing at 1050 21st St, NW in Foggy Bottom).  As you can see, on April 14, 1872, all activity (attendance, marks, and grades) have been blocked out because school was out! The teacher’s note reads: “No School-cause ‘Emancipation Celebration’ Schools closed to attend ‘Emancipation Celebration’”.  Just 10 years after it was signed into law, freed slaves and residents of the city celebrated their day of emancipation with a district-wide holiday.
The Stevens School, named for Congressmen Thaddeus Stevens (PA), opened as one of the first publicly funded schools for African Americans in 1868.  At the time of its closing in 2008, it was the longest continuously operated school building in DC.
The Sumner School archives contains a large series of historical record books dating as far back as the mid-1800s.  These books were mass produced and given to teachers at the beginning of the school year to record the daily grades and attendance of students.  Other classroom related things that were recorded include lists of visitors, inventory of supplies, list of suspension and corporal punishment, and materials sent home to sick students.  The books also contain detailed annual registers of pupils.  The register recorded information about each student including: student’s age, home address, parents names and occupations, and admission dates.  This last element of the Record Books could be a valuable resource for family and local historians.
RG General Records of DCPS; series: Record Books

Emancipation Day in the schools

This is a page from a Record Book for Intermediate School No 3, which was inside the Stevens School (still standing at 1050 21st St, NW in Foggy Bottom).  As you can see, on April 14, 1872, all activity (attendance, marks, and grades) have been blocked out because school was out! The teacher’s note reads: “No School-cause ‘Emancipation Celebration’ Schools closed to attend ‘Emancipation Celebration’”.  Just 10 years after it was signed into law, freed slaves and residents of the city celebrated their day of emancipation with a district-wide holiday.

The Stevens School, named for Congressmen Thaddeus Stevens (PA), opened as one of the first publicly funded schools for African Americans in 1868.  At the time of its closing in 2008, it was the longest continuously operated school building in DC.

The Sumner School archives contains a large series of historical record books dating as far back as the mid-1800s.  These books were mass produced and given to teachers at the beginning of the school year to record the daily grades and attendance of students.  Other classroom related things that were recorded include lists of visitors, inventory of supplies, list of suspension and corporal punishment, and materials sent home to sick students.  The books also contain detailed annual registers of pupils.  The register recorded information about each student including: student’s age, home address, parents names and occupations, and admission dates.  This last element of the Record Books could be a valuable resource for family and local historians.

RG General Records of DCPS; series: Record Books

Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives to Dedicate Gallery to William T. Webb Jr.—A Tribute to a Pioneering DC Public Schools Photojournalist

Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives to Dedicate Gallery to William T. Webb Jr.—A Tribute to a Pioneering DC Public Schools Photojournalist

Field Trip! Ross Elementary School

Today the Sumner School welcomed 5th grade students from Ross Elementary School in Dupont Circle.  The John W. Ross Elementary School was built in 1888 as the first site of the John Quincey Adams Elementary School, renamed Ross in 1935, and used as an administrative building during the mid twentieth century.

RT @followamuseum: Why do ppl follow museums on Twitter? Museums please R/T this survey - https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/museums_on_twitter

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